Posts Tagged ‘reading’

I think step #1 is the most important. You can’t know where you’re going if you don’t have a map and a plan.

Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors

So I was gone for a while and then came across some stuff that’s been going on and realized I needed to come back.  🙂

I’m not sure where to start.  I have a lot of things on my mind, and it’s been (what feels to me) a long time.  Probably, the most pressing thing on my mind is what’s been happening to a few authors I know.  Some authors who did well in 2012 have seen a drop in income this year.  I’m not one of them, but I have noticed my new releases don’t sell as well as they used to.  The only thing that might be buffering me is the fact that I am able to write fast.  But that doesn’t mean writing fast will always mean that income will continue to go up, or even that income will stay steady.

Writing books is one of those…

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Don’t Wait to Write that Sequel

A recent BookDaily.com article on writing your sequel.

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It wasn’t the first dead body Derek Finley had seen.  He stepped carefully around the blood that pooled next to the corps lying face down on the throw rug with both hands out stretched, as if he tried to crawl away from the attack before taking his last breath.   The victim’s white silk shirt turned a dark crimson from the blood, showed six entry holes in the back.  Derek focused on the holes then clicked the button on the top of the camera causing the flash to fill the low-lit, posh hotel room.  Taking a step to his right, he snapped another picture of the wounds from a different angle.    A cold steel knot laid in the pit of his stomach, but not from the bullet-riddled body, as a patrol officer in Saint Cloud Minnesota, he had responded to several fatality accidents, some very gruesome, bullet holes did not compare to dismemberment.  Then later as a detective assigned to the drug task force, dealing with meth maggots, he had investigated shootings and knifings, it seemed where there were drugs, there was also murder.   No, the body on the floor was not what ate at him.  It was the little girl.   His jaw clinched again as his eyes moved to the photo on the coffee table.  Two jet-black pigtails stuck out from the sides of her little head.  Her face beamed with bright eyes, a large smile and cute dimples on her smooth brown skin.  She looked really happy, he thought.  Not that, smile for the camera cheesy smile but genuine joy, the joy of innocence that only a three-year-old little girl can know.   He felt his jaw clinch tighter as that knot twisted in his gut.  He brought his eyes back to the viewfinder on the camera, stepped to the right again and snapped another picture.   With his next step, now by the victim’s feet, he over exaggerated raising his foot up making sure to clear the empty brass 9mm shell on the glossy, marble tiled floor just off the edge of the rug.   Snap, another picture.

Good article for you writers out there.

http://writerswhokill.blogspot.com/2012/08/writing-suspense.html

I haven’t written anything in months, I think it’s time to start writing again. “Rookie Case”, the novelette prequel to Rock Bottom, is about 1/3 done; “Warrior Dad”, my short story, is about 1/2 done; and the first few chapters of “Road of Revenge”, the sequel to “Rock Bottom”, have been written for almost a year. Trying to figure out what to get back on first. Any suggestions?

The old man’s head nodded as if agreeing with his own statement. His armor creaked again as he leaned back against the big chair, his eyes returning to the fire. I stared with intensity as he sat in silence, all the time pondering his words. Time passed slowly and he spoke not a word, nor uttered a sound for several minutes, he simply watched the fire burn down. Soon I found myself staring at the blaze, the large logs that lay in the hearth when I came in, now almost completely consumed and much of the flame replaced by orange glowing embers.

Suddenly I saw movement out of the corner of my eye and jerked my head to my right, a young man moving along the wall carrying three large logs. He looked to be no more than eighteen years old. His short brown hair capped his pale face and matched his tunic. His soft shoes made no sound on the stone floor and he went about his work without a word. I watched as he laid the logs on the stones then knelt down and grabbed an iron poker from the edge of the large fireplace. He stirred the coals piling them with precision where he wanted them then one at a time placed the new logs on the fire and adjusted them with the poker before returning it to its place. Once finished he stood, turned to the old man and bowed at the waist. The old man closed his eyes and gave one nod of his head. The servant moved back out across the room as quietly as he came in.

“Honor,” He finally broke the silence. “A warrior has honor.” He said matter of factually, keeping his attention focused on the fire as the newly added logs began to pop and hiss. “Men are born noble or common but their actions determine whether they are honorable or not. If a man is; honest in his dealings, fair to those both below and above him in status, shows integrity in his beliefs and actions then he has honor.”

“Sire, again I am simply a farmer. My status was determined for me at birth and I simply do what is instructed of me, at times I even wonder if I have freewill.” The words slipped from my lips before I could stop them. His eyes snapped back to mine and in an instant, I knew I had made a mistake.  His eyes widened, lips pursed and his face flushed but I watched as he held in his frustration allowing his temper settle before speaking.

“Is my manager there every time you take in your harvest or when each calf or lamb is born?”

“No Sire, He simply comes to collect your share when it is time.”

“So, you could steal from me without getting caught then?” His eyebrow arched again. “So, have you stolen from me?”

“NO, Sire!” My back stiffened and my eyes widened. A moment of panic spread over me as my mind raced back through the years, had I taken too much or held back even the slightest? No, my conscience was clear, not so much as a fleck of grain had I taken or withheld from my master. “No, I have not taken anything that was not due me and have given everything that has been required of me.”

“Why have you done this when you could have taken more than you deserved.  Were you afraid of getting caught?” That quick smile flashed for the briefest of seconds again then vanished, leaving just the raised brow again.

“I have given what was due, because it was the right thing to do.”

“So you did what was right when no one was watching, simply because it was right? That shows honor. Anyone does what is right when it benefits him to do so, but a man of honor does what is right because it is right. Do you pay the men you hire for your harvest what they deserve or do you short them a little, giving you more in your pocket?”

“No Sire, the harvest is hard work. They put in a full day of work and for that, I pay them a fair day’s wage. Growing up helping my father in your fields, I know all too well the sweat that goes into the harvest. I would never expect a man to work like that without being compensated properly for it.”

“You are not a rich man, yet I hear you give to the poor. I heard that you not only gave the old widow that lives near my orchard one of your milk cows, but that you went to her house, patched her roof and put in wood for her fire for the winter.”

“Yes, she lives alone and has no family.” I shrugged off his comments as if it were nothing that any man would not do. “At her age she is not able to do those things on her own, so I help as I can.”

“I was right!” His brow furrowed and his eyes drilled into me as he continued. “You have honor and courage. I believe you are a warrior!”

After writing my post the other day- “Finish What You Start!” -my daughter made the statement, “I have a hard time starting a story.” her complaint wasn’t that she didn’t have good story ideas or characters, but that she couldn’t come up with that perfect opening line. The question became “How do you start writing a new story?”

My answer is, you type. I know, I know, one of the most important parts of any story is the opening line or the first paragraph. It needs to catch the readers attention and draw them into the story, making them feel a connection with the characters and build a desire to know where it’s going. But waiting around for the perfect line to pop into your head is like waiting on the Lotto check to magically appear in your mail box. Most of the time it’s not going to happen.

When I wrote Rock Bottom, I came up with my opening line and the story formed from it– Life! That’s what it is, just life. When I started the prequel, Rookie Case, I didn’t have a great opening, but I started writing. As I’ve worked on the project, I’ve slowly refined the beginning and now have it almost where I want it. The important thing is I wrote. Getting something down to work with is crucial. Just like a potter can’t form anything until he has a lump of clay, a writer can’t edit, fix or adjust his work if he hasn’t written anything.